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Best Practices

Best PracticesInfectious disease specialist Dr. Tsoline Kojaoghlanian is a case study in giving back to the community.

When COVID-19 began its inexorable spread across the United States, with mass anxiety and confusion rising with
every uptick in what came to be known as “the Curve,” Armenian health professionals and communities across the country had an inside edge: the eloquent and compelling Dr. Tsoline Kojaoghlanian. Despite an increasingly overwhelming professional reality in front of her, one that comes once a century, Dr. Kojaoghlanian felt an urgent call to service, determined to arm her own community with relevant and practical information.

From that point on, this persuasive dynamo, who appears week after week on household Zoom screens and Facebook pages across the Internet, is prepared to take questions, explain the science, vet the data, and give no-nonsense advice as to how families can stay safe and healthy. As a longstanding board member of the Armenian-American Health Professionals Organization (AAHPO) with a mission to promote and advance the science and art of healing and to educate and improve the health of the Armenian community, Dr. Kojaoghlanian felt an urgent call to service as soon as the news of the virus began circulating through the medical community in early 2020.

“I contacted key members of the AAHPO board. Speaking as an infectious disease specialist, I explained that this virus needed to be taken extremely seriously and urgently.”

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Examining Continuing Medical Education In Armenia

AAHPO member Gevorg Yaghjyan MD, PHD, recently co-authored an informative article published in the Journal of European CME, examining medical education and continuing professional development in Armenia, from past to present.

The article describes the phases of evolution of continuing medical education chronologically and details the legislative and regulatory framework surrounding each stage of development.

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What You Need To Know About The Ebola and Enterovirus D68

Ebola Virus

The CDC asserts that Ebola does not pose a significant risk to the U.S. public. Ebola is spread only through direct contact with bodily fluids, and people infected with Ebola are not contagious to others until symptoms have appeared. CDC has very well-established protocols in place to isolate people who may have been exposed and monitor them for appearance of Ebola symptoms. These protocols are being enforced in Texas.

Q. What is Ebola?
A.
Ebola virus is the cause of a viral hemorrhagic fever disease. Symptoms include: fever, headache, joint and muscle aches, weakness, diarrhea, vomiting, stomach pain, lack of appetite, and abnormal bleeding. Symptoms may appear anywhere from 2 to 21 days after exposure to ebolavirus though 8-10 days is most common.

Q: Are there any cases of individuals contracting Ebola in the U.S.?
A.
No.

Q. What about Americans ill with Ebola who are being brought to the U.S. for treatment?
A.
CDC has very well-established protocols in place to ensure the safe transport and care of patients with infectious diseases back to the United States. These procedures cover the entire process — from patients leaving their bedside in a foreign country to their transport to an airport and boarding a non-commercial airplane equipped with a special transport isolation unit, to their arrival at a medical facility in the United States that is appropriately equipped and staffed to handle such cases. CDC’s role is to ensure that travel and hospitalization is done to minimize risk of spread of infection and to ensure that the American public is protected. Patients were evacuated in similar ways during SARS.

Q. Can Ebola be transmitted through the air?
A. No. Ebola is not a respiratory disease like the flu, so it is not transmitted through the air.

Q. Can I get Ebola from contaminated food or water?
A.
No. Ebola is not a food-borne illness.  It is not a water-borne illness.

Q. Can I get Ebola from a person who is infected but doesn’t have any symptoms?
A.
No. Individuals who are not symptomatic are not contagious. In order for the virus to be transmitted, an individual would have to have direct contact with an individual who is experiencing symptoms.

Ebola Virus Q&A

Q. What is Ebola?
A. Ebola virus is the cause of a viral hemorrhagic fever disease. Symptoms include: fever, headache, joint and muscle aches, weakness, diarrhea, vomiting, stomach pain, lack of appetite, and abnormal bleeding. Symptoms may appear anywhere from 2 to 21 days after exposure to ebolavirus though 8-10 days is most common.

Q: Are there any cases of individuals contracting Ebola in the U.S.?
A.
No.

Q. What about Americans ill with Ebola who are being brought to the U.S. for treatment?
A.
CDC has very well-established protocols in place to ensure the safe transport and care of patients with infectious diseases back to the United States. These procedures cover the entire process — from patients leaving their bedside in a foreign country to their transport to an airport and boarding a non-commercial airplane equipped with a special transport isolation unit, to their arrival at a medical facility in the United States that is appropriately equipped and staffed to handle such cases. CDC’s role is to ensure that travel and hospitalization is done to minimize risk of spread of infection and to ensure that the American public is protected. Patients were evacuated in similar ways during SARS.

Q. Can Ebola be transmitted through the air?
A.
No. Ebola is not a respiratory disease like the flu, so it is not transmitted through the air.

Q. Can I get Ebola from contaminated food or water?
A.
No. Ebola is not a food-borne illness.  It is not a water-borne illness.

Q. Can I get Ebola from a person who is infected but doesn’t have any symptoms?
A.
No. Individuals who are not symptomatic are not contagious. In order for the virus to be transmitted, an individual would have to have direct contact with an individual who is experiencing symptoms.